Other 2000’s Music Genres |
Best Albums of the Decade |
Artists |


Zeros were the peak of such electronica styles like drum and bass (Pendulum), dancecore (Basshunter), progressive (Global Deejays), and electro house (Benny Benassi). Trance and the classic house kept up their momentum, and my favorite synthpop faded a bit to shine in new colors in the next decade. Hardstyle and big beat also continued to tear up dancefloors with songs from The Prodigy, Scooter, Groove Armada, and The Chemical Brothers. At the end of the decade, new stars like Calvin Harris and Deadmau5 were on their feet.

Well, talking about electronic music, I would like to mention Moby separately. At the beginning of the new century, he not only got a lot of Grammy nominations, but he even performed the soundtrack for one of the N-Gage games called Asphalt: Urban GT 2. This period gave a lot of delicious music, which I’m happy to share with you today, friends.


Contents


Best 2000’s Electronica Songs
(Exclusive Playlist from Smart2000s Project)

The main course today will be served to you from the beginning. I’ve been compiling this collection for several years. It includes the greatest compositions of the genre, in my opinion. But I must warn you, I can’t include all the tracks here, so I will only present one or two from each artist. Only in rare exceptions will there be more ones.

Everything else is up to you to find. But the task is not too difficult. It would be best if you listened to the songs, and when you like something, you google the artists and taste the rest of their works. Everything is straightforward. After all, clutter the space with all the songs from each artist would not be a beneficial decision. I’ll also present worthy tracks that don’t have music videos. Therefore, to keep the flavor of the 2000’s EDM music, I hope I will do it to the full.

Today’s compilation begins with a song with a symbolic name that perfectly describes my attitude to the 2000s. Let’s go!

Zest of the Decade’s Sound 

Let me start by saying that it seems like just yesterday I could hear Benny Benassi’s “saw” from almost every second window while walking through a summer city. It s hard to count the number of hits he wrote using that famous sound. In addition, I recommend listening to the soundtracks of the Stark Raving Mad movie and the game called Smuggler’s Run 2 to immerse yourself in the atmosphere of club music of that time.

Renaissance of the 1980s

Continuing the 2000’s electronica theme, I should note that it was primarily remembered by the flow of successful regenerations of the compositions from the 1980s. A couple of enthusiasts from Germany created two bands: Master Blaster for dancecore and Vinylshakerz for nu-disco & house. Both projects regenerated the hits of the golden era of music (no offense to my favorite zeros, but the juiciest music was precisely two decades earlier). Or legendary “Call on Me” video (the song is basing on Steve Winwood’s “Valerie”), which the British Prime Minister called unfit for viewing. But that did not make Eric Prydz’s clip any less popular among the public. 

These are playlists with the best tracks of the projects. You can switch between songs by clicking “Next.”

Pakito and his famous trumpet gave the second life of the song by Trans-X. It’s funny to remember how I fantasized and imagined myself as a DJ, playing his tracks. My dance floor was movable and like a futuristic trailer to a truck, which was my coolest entertainment van. There were trumpet-shaped megaphones along the entire length, emitting very familiar tunes. And there I was, rushing along a wide highway with delicious music blasting around.

Also significant were the house revivals of classic songs from Michael Jackson and Oliver Cheatham performed by Hi-Tack and Michael Gray. We should not forget the Supermode project too. They conquered the charts with “Tell Me Why” (Bronski Beat – Smalltown Boy). It consisted of Steve Angelo and Axwell. Sebastian Ingrosso will come to them in a few years, and they will turn the world of house music upside down, forming their legendary trio. I mean Swedish House Mafia, of course. Personally, I take the piano part from the track “Greyhound” as an anthem of the new house generation.

Continuing talking about the Swedish scene, I like StoneBridge. This guy perfectly captures the vibe of our favorite zeros. Listening to his works, I started my first steps in the development of the Smart2000s project. So his songs are very precious to me. There were a lot of funny moments too. For example, I heard the remix before the original track and thought it was the original song. I mean “Evian Water Boy” (Queen – We Will Rock You) and “The Riddle” by Gigi D’Agostino (Dead Or Alive – You Spin Me Right Round). 

Similarly, I have a separate story about the track “In My Arms” by Mylo, which I adored terribly (as well as its remix by Tocadisco). I heard the regeneration here fifteen years earlier than the original song. And it’s also the eighties song “Waiting for a Star to Fall” by Boy Meets Girl that charmed me even more! There is a sincere feeling of true love, which the song itself absorbed from its creators. It’s infrequent to see something like that. By the way, the blond girl in the video is their daughter. If we go back to the 2000’s version, Scotsman Mylo also used a sample of Kim Carnes’ song “Bette Davis Eyes” in that composition. The latter inspired me to use double claps in my tracks.

Artists did not ignore the 1970s either. Shana Vanguarde did an excellent remake of ABBA’s hits in a new arrangement. And the 1960s were remembered by Royal Gigolos and Global Deejays. These are related projects, and they have the same leaders. Interestingly, the second one became famous because of the city, where before the release of the track “San-Francisco,” its creators had never been.

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Dancecore

I would not like to call dancecore the style of one artist, but only Basshunter has achieved worldwide recognition among its representatives. However, the genre’s sound is wholly associated with the 2000s and evokes nostalgia from the first chords. It was to it many people liked to perform Tecktonik (Electro Dance). This dance at first became mega-popular, but then began to annoy with its omnipresence and smoothly disappeared from the mainstream.

Drum and Bass

I have a unique attitude towards drum n bass. Before the second half of the zeros, I didn’t have an opportunity to listen to music with quality headphones with bright low frequencies, so some genres seemed to me tasteless because of that. But the first time I heard Pendulum’s “9,000 Miles” on quality equipment, I was stunned. It was like lightning shooting through my whole body. Now I see it as one of the best 2000’s songs.

At one moment, it opened my eyes to how wrong I had been when I ignored this genre. The lingering bass lines and signature rhythm did something unimaginable in my head. Besides Pendulum, the style is well known by me, thanks to The Qemists. I recently returned from their live performance, and the following day, I felt so much muscle pain from dancing that it’s hard to have such an effect even in the gym.

Trance

Also, check out BT. He has become one of the fundamental composers of the genre. You can hear his tracks in American Pie, The Fast and the Furious, and 3000 Miles to Graceland. Awesome soundtracks, so to say. BT had a fruitful collaboration with Tiesto and Armin van Buuren, which were still gaining popularity. When I told my friends the full name of the second one, they looked at me with a surprised glance and said, “What? Did you make up that incomprehensible syllable yourself?”

House

If the Dutch excelled in the trance, the French scene conquered the house. Bob Sinclar, Daft Punk, and David Guetta made the difference. The latter has moved closer to pop culture in the new decade. Let’s take, for example, the album called “7”, which was the last one in the 2010s for the Frenchman. I want to share my feelings from listening to it.

Seven IMHOs

Imagine that you haven’t been to your favorite restaurant in over ten years. In your memory, it’s still a cozy little place with the best food in town. So you decide to stop by and see how it’s doing today. The same sign from the street greets you, but the building itself has been modernized and has grown considerably in size. You go inside, and it’s even more impressive: the crowds of satisfied customers and the new dĂ©cor. You sit down and order the signature dish. The anticipation begins as notes of intrigue and nostalgia mingle in your maelstrom of emotions.

It’s finally in front of you. And it is the meat in the dough, which is the kind you usually get in cheap station fast foods. But this is not a restaurant-quality dish. As you look at it, you notice drops of cheap oil oozing out of it. You involuntarily catch yourself thinking that cooks use this oil for several days. That is, not throwing it out but frying something with it over and over again. Closing your nose, you try to taste it, but it turns out to be even worse than it looks from the outside. That’s exactly how the album turned out. In my humble opinion, of course.

This is a widespread situation in cases where a narrowly focused performer is trying to popularize his work. The only exception is Daft Punk. But anyway, the “hype” (I really dislike this word, but here it is very appropriate) album “Random Access Memories” is not too close to the compositions of the live album Alive 2007, or ingenious adaptation of the studio one Discovery called Interstella 5555. Compare them, and you’ll catch the difference.

My 2000’s Electronica

Now let’s talk a bit about the situation in my native Ukraine. Almost every teenager knew the names of DJ Anna Lee and, especially, the man with the pseudonym of the hero of the novel War and Peace. It was the time when I successfully enticed my classmates to literature class with the intriguing phrase: “We’ll listen to about Andrei Bolkonsky.” No, I didn’t read Leo Tolstoy ahead of the school curriculum. It’s because even at home, I bore everyone with this name, and my mother explained to me that Andrei Balkonsky is not only a DJ. Sadly, Andrei Derkach (this is the real name of the Ukrainian DJ) is no longer with us. But his great mixes, which taught the youth of the 2000s to listen to good music, will stay with us forever.

I won’t say anything about Kazantip at all because I’ve dedicated a separate material to it. But you can hear the music from this festival in this material’s playlist too. For the CIS dance music, this fest was the center of the Universe. Also, one of my favorite electronica projects is still Katya Chekhova, which had its heyday in the perfect years, the middle of the 2000s. It’s when the gloom of the 1990s had finally gone away from our territories, and the financial crisis of 2008 had not yet set in.

Conclusion

In general, it isn’t easy to list all the goodies that artists presented then in the form of musical creations. I tried to show at least some of them in the playlist. And you probably agree that it’s hard to believe that these works are already so “mature.” Besides that, I’ve collected my tracks and mixes in the style of 2000’s electronica on the Music page. If you’re interested, I’d be glad to see you there.

Friends, I hope you enjoyed today’s trip to those nostalgic times to the fullest. Have a good day, and see you in the material dedicated to the 2000’s Rock soon. Bye, everybody!

This review of the 2000’s electronica is written by

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